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Vox Populi

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Eraicon-Syndicate

Vox Populi
Technical information
Description

Marx is giving a speech but worries that his rally will be a target for violence. So he asks an Assassin for help.

Memory type

Karl Marx memory

Full sync

  • Hide a body in a hiding spot.
  • Don't kill any policemen.
Previous

An Explosive End

Historical information
Ancestor

Jacob Frye/Evie Frye

Location

London, United Kingdom

Date

1868

Vox Populi was a virtual representation of one of Jacob Frye and Evie Frye's genetic memories, relived by a Helix initiate through the Helix Navigator.

DescriptionEdit

Jacob or Evie spoke with Karl Marx, who asked for their protection while he gave a speech.

DialogueEdit

  • Marx: I'm so relieved to have found you! I fear my upcoming meeting is going to be disrupted. Strike-breakers, maybe, or police spies. Ruffians, who fear the march of progress.
  • Jacob: Ah. So I'm bodyguarding, then. Marvelous!
  • Marx: I worry that any agitation will incite terrible violence, so please remove any trouble makers without attracting any attention.
    Wunderbar!
    (Wonderful!) Thank you! I must prepare, but I will see you inside shortly!

Evie's response differed slightly.

  • Marx: I'm so relieved to have found you! I fear my upcoming meeting is going to be disrupted. Strike-breakers, maybe, or police spies. Ruffians, who fear the march of progress.
  • Evie: Fear not, Mr. Marx. I'll look after you.
  • Marx: I worry that any agitation will incite terrible violence, so please remove any trouble makers without attracting any attention.
    Wunderbar!
    (Wonderful!) Thank you! I must prepare, but I will see you inside shortly!

Marx departed to give his speech, while Jacob or Evie infiltrated the crowds.

  • Announcer: Ladies and gentlemen, united workers, the man we're here to see needs no introduction, but I shall give him one anyway. He has sacrificed so much in the hope that we may all benefit. Please give a warm reception to Mr. Karl Marx.
  • Marx: Workers, Comrades. Thank you for your most generous welcome. I come before you today with a heavy heart. England stands at the head of commercial and industrial Europe. In the last two decades there has been an unheard of development of industry and unprecedented increase in exports and imports. While these are facts to be celebrated by the provident classes, for the workers very little has changed.
    You well know under what conditions of shattered health, damaged morals and spiritual ruin this increase of wealth and power was produced for the upper classes, by the working class. It has become a truce that no perfecting of machinery, no application of science to industry, no improvement on the means of communication, no new colonies, no immigration, no opening out of new markets, no free trade and not all these things put together can do away with the misery of the toiling masses. But rather, on the contrary, that upon the present false basis, every new development of the productive power of labour must lead to the widening of the gap between the classes and to the heightening of social antagonisms. During this epoch of economic progress, death from starvation has raised itself almost to the rank of a social institution, here in London, the capital of the British Empire.
    In the annals of world history, this age will be characterized by the more impetuous force, the more expanded range and the deadlier effects of the social plague known as the commercial and industrial crisis. I believe that it is not necessary that the means of labour should be monopolized as a means of dominating the workers and exploiting them. That just like slavery and serfdom, so also wage labour is only a transitory subordinate social form, which is destined to vanish before associated labour, which will accomplish its work with willing hands, vigorous mind and cheerful heart.
    It has been said that the House of Commons is a House of Landlords. I put it to you today, that to capture political power is now the great duty of the working class! We must attempt the political reorganization of the workers if we are to improve their lot. The workers must go forward in a united fashion, with the simultaneous demand that the simple laws of morality and justice, which are considered right in the relations of private persons, shall be recognized as the supreme law governing labour in this country! The struggle for such a policy is embraced in the universal struggle for the emancipation of the working class. And so I say to you, proletarians of all lands, unite! In order to free the workers, the cooperative system of labour requires to develop on a national scale. And following from that, must be furthered by national means. For their part, the lords of the land and the lords of capital will continue steadily to use their political privileges for the defense and perpetuation of their monopoly. Instead of furthering the emancipation of the workers, they will act so as to bring every possible obstacle in the way.

Jacob grabbed hold of a man intent on disrupting the gathering.

  • Troublemaker 1: Where did you come from?
    Ow! Owwww!
    Are you mad?
    If any of my friends see you, we'll start shooting!
    Let me go!
    You're making a big mistake!
  • Jacob: YOU didn't see me. I doubt your friends will either.
  • Troublemaker 1: You can't get all of us!
  • Jacob: Oh, yes I can.
  • Troublemaker 1: This crowd's a powderkeg, and I'm the fuse!
  • Jacob: Well, I'm the - Oh, shut up.
  • Troublemaker 1: Go on, cause a fuss, give us a reason to kill Marx.
  • Jacob: I think taking you out quickly and quietly will do nicely.

Evie's interaction with the troublemaker would be slightly different.

  • Troublemaker 1: Where did you come from?
    Ow! Owwww!
    Are you mad?
    If any of my friends see you, we'll start shooting!
  • Evie: It'll all be over in the blink of an eye.
  • Troublemaker 1: You can't get all of us!
  • Evie: You just worry about you.
  • Troublemaker 1: This crowd's a powderkeg, and I'm the fuse!
  • Evie: How very poetic.
  • Troublemaker 1: Go on, cause a fuss, give us a reason to kill Marx.
  • Evie: I prefer a more subtle approach.

Jacob or Evie located three other suspicious men, whom they also extracted from the crowd and knocked out. Soon after, more troublemakers announced their presence by shooting into the air.

  • Troublemaker 2: Ladies and gentlemen! This meeting is adjourned! You're all free to go. Apart from Mr. Marx. Him we want to have words with.

Jacob or Evie sprang into action.

  • Jacob: Stay here. I'll deal with this.
    It can never be easy, can it?
  • Evie: Stay behind the lectern, Mr. Marx. This is what I'm here for.
    Here we go again.
  • Marx: Yes. Yes, quite.

Jacob or Evie defeated the attackers.

  • Troublemaker 3: We're outclassed! Leg it!

The remaining Blighters fled.

  • Marx: You've done a great service for the workers of London. I'm confident the reforms we seek cannot be far over the horizon. I don't suppose you'd formally join the Workers' Party?
  • Jacob: I'm not much for politics.
  • Evie: He's not much for anything that requires deep thought.
  • Marx: Does that mean you'll join, Comrade Evie?
  • Evie: I'm afraid I have other responsibilities.
  • Marx: Honorary memberships, perhaps?
  • Jacob: You don't give up, do you?
  • Marx: We seem to have that in common! Auf Wiedersehen (Goodbye), my friends.

OutcomeEdit

The Frye twins successfully protected Marx, even as a fight broke out, for which he thanked them. He then offered them a place in the Workers' Party, which they cordially rejected.

TriviaEdit

  • The memory's title is Latin for "voice of the people".

ReferenceEdit

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