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Assassin's Creed Music Review: Part 1


The other day I downloaded the Assassin's Creed and Assassin's Creed 2 Original Soundtracks from iTunes.

It goes without saying, I loved, (not "liked", LOVED) the albums. From playing the game, you get a good feel for the music, but... it's fair to say you will get a totally new experience from putting in your headphones and just letting the music flow.

AC album art

Assassin's Creed Original Soundtrack

Composed by: Jesper Kyd

Track Listing

1. City of Jerusalem 3:11

2. Flight Through Jerusalem 3:39

3. Spirit of Damascus 1:31

4. Trouble in Jerusalem 4:04

5. Acre Underworld 3:24

6. Access the Animus 9:34

7. Dunes of Death 1:46

8. Masyaf in Danger 3:43

9. Meditation Begins 2:47

10. Meditation of the Assassin 3:43

11. The Bureau 3:12

Jesper has really outdone himself on this one. Assassin's Creed really emphasizes both the action and slower paced sequences of the game. The soundtrack utilizes a middle eastern theme to its music, including such as aspects as drums, symbols and spoken chanting. "City of Jerusalem" makes excellent use of these aspects. One can almost imagine the tranquil setting in the beautiful city, making one think of the fountains, temples, and ornate structures. On the other hand, faster paced tracks show us a double edged blade to the album, if you'll pardon the pun. "Trouble in Jerusalem", as it's name implies, is the music that plays when you enter open conflict in said city. The jarring sound and thematic chanting makes the listener feel they are right next to Altair in combat, sword in hand. Kyd's music really conveys a sense of danger, granted a thrilling sense at that. Another enjoyable aspect is the change in theme between areas of the game. Music theme, instruments and languages used will differ from Acre, Jerusalem, the Kingdom, and Damascus. This gives the soundtrack a most enjoyable sense of positioning and age, qualities that were made famous in the game.

If only it was consistent. A good deal of the tracks seem to be only "lesser" pieces, some even reduced to ambience. "Dunes of Death" is one of the more forgettable tracks, for example. The tricky part with soundtracks is that if it works with the game, it won't nessessarily work listening to the music on it's own. Kyd no doubt intended for the music to be used in conjunction with the game. (which was amazingly done)

Another minor gripe I have (yes, I apologize AC fans), is the sometimes longish wait for "the good bits" of the track. A classic example being "Access the Animus". Many players recall their first assassination target. The chase music that plays when the city is on high alert is the best part of the entire soundtrack in my opinion. But... it's around a seven minute wait, or an annoying fast forward when on the train or bus to get to it. Not to say the the aforementioned seven minutes shouldn't have been in the game, or not composed at all. On the contrary, it is well worth the wait for a new listener.

Overall, the Assassin's Creed Original Soundtrack is a must have for any Assassin's Creed fan. The music is haunting, thrilling, dangerous, beautiful and overall brilliant. Jesper Kyd conveys the true story of Assassin's Creed in the composing of such a wonderful album, and does the video game industry proud by scheming up a soundtrack worthy of any listener. The wonderfully themed music will make any listener want to flick out their hidden blade, and go on the prowl for their next target.

DisMEMBAH 14:11, June 2, 2010 (UTC)

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