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ACO Praxilla


Praxilla was an Egyptian healer. She devoted her life to healing the poor in her father Theramenes' makeshift clinic in Balagrae.


Praxilla first met the Medjay Bayek in 47 BCE, when he visited Balagrae in search of Flavius Metellus, a member of the Order of the Ancients. Together with Bayek they killed some of Flavius' men stationed in Balagrae. They then rescued an old blind lady, Nenet. After getting Nenet to safety, Praxilla directed Bayek to Diocles, a friend in Cyrene, and bade him farewell.[1] Praxilla asked for Bayek's help once more in finding some missing villagers. She told Bayek to search for her friend Crios while she would go looking for Melitta, a priestess. Bayek found Crios at the Asklepieion, delusional and delirious, a clear sign of the Apple's power. Melitta, the priestess that Praxilla had gone to see, had suffered the same fate. Melitta was the one behind the missing villagers, and was torturing them. Praxilla tried to reason with Melitta but to no avail. When Bayek assassinated Melitta, Praxilla was disappointed she couldn't slit her throat herself.[2]

Some time after the death of Flavius, Praxilla was invited to the Oracle of Apollo by Bayek. Also at the Oracle were Diocles and Vitruvius, the three of them would help build society back up. It was at this meeting that Diocles announced he and Praxilla were to be wed. Diocles later moved to Balagrae to be with Praxilla.[3]

Personality and characteristics

As a healer, Praxilla made the sacred oath to never cause death. However, to defend innocent people, she could fight and kill.


  • "Praxilla" is possibly a derivative of Praxis, meaning "practical" in Greek.